So what’s next for Habermehl?

So what’s next for Habermehl?

Press Release | June 15, 2013

Robert Habermehl, animal abuser, outside Calgary courthouse


Robert Habermehl tries to avoid media by raising a briefcase as he leaves the Calgary Courts Centre April 30, 2013 in Calgary, Alta. Habermehl was charged in 2009 with causing an animal distress under the Animal Protection Act and a Criminal Code charges for injuring a cat. Jim Wells/Calgary Sun/QMI Agency

Robert Habermehl tries to avoid media by raising a briefcase as he leaves the Calgary Courts Centre April 30, 2013 in Calgary, Alta. Habermehl was charged in 2009 with causing an animal distress under the Animal Protection Act and a Criminal Code charges for injuring a cat. Jim Wells/Calgary Sun/QMI Agency

The D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation wants the press to be aware that on Monday, June 17th at 9:00 a.m., Robert Habermehl will be in Calgary court. Habermehl was charged on November 27, 2009 for physical abuse after a cat in his care, Minnie, was found so severely injured that she had to be humanely euthanasia.

This has been a long and trying court case. We’re hoping that Mr. Habermehl’s “heart attack” will have no impact on the sentence the judge planned on giving him. This guy has been trying to weasel himself out of a conviction, and now a sentence, for almost 4 years. He has cost, and continues to cost, the tax payers a lot of money.

The D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation has dealt with several people who appear to have mental issues, but Mr. Habermehl ‘takes the cake’. He has even threatened the judge; i.e. “You’re going to be sorry if you put me in jail.” He thinks the case should be thrown out of court because “everybody thinks I’m a monster and I’ve suffered enough.” What about the suffering of Minnie, whose intestines were hanging out, and Melanie Manning, his girlfriend at the time, who has suffered with the guilt of not leaving Robert soon enough and witnessing Minnie’s intestines hanging out and then the loss of her beloved pet.

He’s made a mockery of the justice system. We’re surprised he hasn’t been charged with contempt of court and/or uttering threats. This is a dangerous man who needs to be punished to the fullest extent of the law. He should be jailed and given therapy.

Once again the D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation wants to thank you.


Robert Habermehl to make his arguments about beating Minnie, a cat

Robert Habermehl to make his arguments about beating Minnie, a cat

Robert Habermehl tries to avoid media by raising a briefcase as he leaves the Calgary Courts Centre April 30, 2013 in Calgary, Alta. Habermehl was charged in 2009 with causing an animal distress under the Animal Protection Act and a Criminal Code charges for injuring a cat. Jim Wells/Calgary Sun/QMI Agency

Robert Habermehl tries to avoid media by raising a briefcase as he leaves the Calgary Courts Centre April 30, 2013 in Calgary, Alta. Habermehl was charged in 2009 with causing an animal distress under the Animal Protection Act and a Criminal Code charges for injuring a cat. Jim Wells/Calgary Sun/QMI Agency

The D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation wants the press to be aware that on Monday, June 3rd, Robert Habermehl will be in Calgary court at 9:00 a.m. to make his arguments in his animal abuse case. Habermehl was charged on November 27, 2009 for physical abuse after a cat in his care was found severely injured. Despite attempts to treat Minnie, it was determined she had to be put down.

Judge Bruce Fraser convicted Habermehl of a charge of willfully causing unnecessary pain, suffering or injury to a cat, after Minnie suffered a blunt trauma injury to her body wall which left her intestines hanging out.

Mr. Habermehl has mental issues and should be punished for his acts of cruelty and given therapy. He claims Minnie put venom in him. He yelled in Minnie’s ear. He even claims she attacked him.

Minnie is dead. This man is dangerous.

We are hoping a very strict penalty is handed down tomorrow. Mr. Habermehl has abused the court system for close to 4 years. This is the longest drawn out court case the D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation has ever attended.

Once again the D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation wants to thank you, the media, for making the public aware and for your continued support in our mission to change the laws. We want to see stricter penalties on those who choose to commit crimes of cruelty on animals.


Calgary man who kicked girlfriend’s puppy to death spared jail time

Calgary man who kicked girlfriend’s puppy to death spared jail time

reprinted from Calgary Herald


A 32-year-old Calgary man who threw his girlfriend’s puppy off a balcony, kicked it to death and sent her photos of the dead pet by text has been spared jail time.

Derick Colin Anderson was given a 10-month conditional sentence, a year of probation and 100 hours of community service.

Anderson is also banned from owning or living with animals and birds.

In handing down the sentence in court Thursday morning, Judge Marlene Graham said she took into account that Anderson has no previous criminal record, is willing to receive treatment for anger issues and suffers from a previously undiagnosed condition called intermittent explosive anger disorder.

The judge also noted that Anderson had a childhood fraught with physical and sexual abuse.

Anderson pleaded guilty last October to the Criminal Code charge of wilfully causing pain to an animal.

Anderson became enraged over finances and took his anger out on the 11-month-old puppy, called Cujo, after it soiled the couple’s rented home while his girlfriend was at work Sept, 24, 2010.

He remains in a relationship with the same girl, and lives in his mother’s basement.

Court earlier heard the accused was annoyed by the dog’s yipping and soiling, reached for it, and the dog snapped at him.

He threw the pet off the balcony, walked over and kicked it, then put the dead animal in a back alley recycling bin.

A necropsy concluded that the dog’s skull had been caved in and that severe blunt trauma caused the injuries.

A sentencing report written by forensic psychiatrist Dr. George Duska said a key aggravating factor to the case was the domestic element, in which Anderson blamed the situation on his girlfriend for getting a dog in the first place.

Duska found Anderson a moderate risk to reoffend.

The maximum penalty under the summary conviction is 18 months.

Crown prosecutor Gord Haight had sought a jail term of six to eight months.

Haight argued against a non-custodial sentence, saying it couldn’t be shown that Anderson could be safely returned to the community and that he did not meet the key requirements of deterrence and denunciation.

Defence lawyer Roy Shellnutt said his client has accepted responsibility for the act and that it is explained, although not excused, by the fact Anderson has since been diagnosed with intermittent explosive disorder.

“I think it was an appropriate sentence. The judge looked at him and all his issues,” Shellnutt said outside court.

“He’s got to do some community service. He’s got to give back.”

An animal rights activist called the sentence too light.

“He’s a sick individual. He definitely needs help,” said Heather Anderson of the Daisy Foundation of Calgary, who attended the sentencing hearing.

Anderson had previously told court he took responsibility for his actions, and that they were sparked by stress and financial woes.



The Lone Survivor of Alleged Negligent Pet Owner Adopted

The Lone Survivor of Alleged Negligent Pet Owner Adopted


We have received word that Debbie Andrew’s former cat has been adopted. Having survived near death, he is living in a wonderful new home. Best to you, Harvie!

HARVIE THE RESCUED CAT FINDS LOVING HOME

by LAVERNE STEWART (Enable Javascript to see the email address)
A cat that was discovered severely dehydrated, starving and covered in fleas is now living in the lap of luxury.

Hilda Alchorn, 76, has always been a cat lover. She went to the Oromocto SPCA last Saturday to donate food and left with two newly adopted cats.

One is a tiny orange female cat called Precious. The other was a neglected cat she’d read about in The Daily Gleaner.

The white cat with black markings — now named Harvie — was rescued from a home in Harvey Station on Sept. 13 by the New Brunswick SPCA and the RCMP.

When the cat was discovered in the house, along with the remains of two dogs and a rabbit, it had to be taken to a veterinarian for treatment. The next day it was placed in the care of the Oromocto SPCA.

SPCA staff members named him Newton. He was so badly flea-bitten, his white fur was stained orange from the blood, said shelter manager Tracy Marcotullio.

Over the past six weeks, the cat recovered from its trauma and was ready for adoption.

Alchorn just happened to ask Marcotullio about what happened to Newton while she was at the shelter to adopt Precious.

“She said, ‘He’s right there at your feet.’ He was rubbing my legs as much to say, ‘Here I am.’ I said ‘That’s it. He’s mine,’ ” Alchorn said.

Over the last six days, Alchorn has bonded with both of her cats but, she said, she has a special place in her heart for Harvie. She decided that since he came from Harvey Station she would keep the name but change the spelling slightly.

“He just wants me to love him all the time. He’s always up on my chest rubbing my face and purring. So I pet him and pet him. When I go to bed he’s right there along side of me,” she said.

Both cats are adjusting to one another, Alchorn and their new home.

Every morning Harvie the cat wakes Alchorn demanding his breakfast of wet cat food. He’s gaining weight, she said.

“If I don’t get up right away, he just curls up beside me and waits. He’s so sweet.”

As Alchorn talked about the joy this rescued cat has brought to her life, Harvie sat looking out the window at leaves falling from the trees outdoors.

Harvie and Precious, she said, will be indoor cats because she is worried they might get hurt if they go outside. Ever since her other cats died, Alchorn said she’s been feeling lonely and her two new pets are bringing her plenty of joy.

“I always have had cats. They are such good company. When I come home they are there waiting for me. Especially Harvie. He follows me around and I pick him up and I talk to him,” she said.

So Alchorn and her two newly adopted cats are happy with their new arrangement. She wonders what they are thinking but when Harvie crawls into her lap or stands on her chest it’s clear this is one contented kitty.

“When he looks me in the eye and he rubs my faces it’s almost as if he is saying, ‘I love you’. He’s adapted to being here as if he’s been here all of his life,” she said.


Outrage that Alleged Negligent Pet Owner Could Avoid Prosecution

Outrage that Alleged Negligent Pet Owner Could Avoid Prosecution

The manager of the Oromocto SPCA wants to see a Canada-wide arrest warrant for Debbie Andrews for her alleged negligence that left two dogs and a rabbit dead and a cat barely alive. You can read the article below from The Daily Gleaner for more.

SPCA Urges Action



Debbie Andrews, Alleged Negligent NB Pet Owner, Skips Town for Alberta

Debbie Andrews, Alleged Negligent NB Pet Owner, Skips Town for Alberta

NB Negligent Pet Owner in Alberta
Click image to read the whole article.


We received the following letter today about a woman from New Brunswick against whom the Crown is expected to issue charges for the deaths of two dogs and a rabbit as well as the abuse of a dehydrated and starved cat who were in her care — at least until she went on vacation out of the country. Seems that maybe her vacation meant more to her than her responsibilities as a pet owner.

I have attached a news article from Friday’s paper about a woman who left New Brunswick to avoid being charged with animal abuse. She was living in Harvey Station, I believe it’s just outside of Fredericton.

Before she went on holidays to the Dominican Republic with her ten year old son, one of her dogs died. She just threw it in a garbage bag and left it in her back porch.  She then went on holidays for TWO WEEKS and left behind a small black dog, a cat and a rabbit with no food or water. After six days the neighbours checked on her house since they didn’t see any activity and discovered the dog dead laying on the kitchen floor. They immediately called the RCMP who also found the rabbit dead left in a cage in the barn. Thankfully the cat survived, although just barely.

When she finally returned from her holidays she obviously found out she was wanted by the RCMP so she skipped town within hours of her return and moved to Alberta.

Not only does she think she got away with murder by moving away, what kind of message does this send to her ten year old son!!!

Just thought you might like to know you have another deadbeat animal abuser in Alberta and it will only be a matter of time before her son becomes an abuser as well.

By all means, DO NOT ADOPT AN ANIMAL TO THIS WOMAN!

And please share this information with all the rescue groups/shelters you know.


Calgary Stampede – Animal Cruelty Protest

Calgary Stampede – Animal Cruelty Protest

The D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation and the Calgary Animal Rights Effort are holding protests on the grassy area across from Stampede/Victoria Park LRT Station, MacLeod Tr. and 15 Av. S.E., Calgary on Saturday and Sunday at noon and 6:00 p.m.

Interviews can be conducted with Heather Anderson on Saturday and with Shannon Mann from the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society on Sunday.

We will be continuing our campaign calling for abolishment of the calf roping event in the Calgary Stampede. We would like to publicly thank The Vancouver Humane Society for their involvement in this campaign.

We’d like to make it known we are not against the entire Calgary Stampede; we just want an end to rodeo and chuck wagon races. Our goal is to eliminate cruelty to animals.

Let the 100th anniversary of the Calgary Stampede be the last year for animal cruelty. There’s lots of fun and entertainment to be had at the Calgary Stampede without exploiting animals by putting them at risk of injury and death.

Once again the D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation wants to thank you, the media, for making the public aware.


Skinned dog found outside Granum

Skinned dog found outside Granum

DOG © Andrii Iurlov | Dreamstime.com


We received the following email over the weekend. It tells a terrible story that we wish was not true. If you have any information about this dog or other similar animals from the area, please call the RCMP in Claresholm at 403-625-4445 immediately.

I was just with the RCMP from Claresholm on the phone.

My daughter found a dead dog outside of the town of Granum and sent me a picture. It looked like it was very fresh, the skin was missing like somebody had skinned it, very clean cut from neck to buttox. His meat was still red colored, no damage to the body other than the missing skin. Fresh probably from today as coyotes would have found him if he would have been there longer.

The police [were] not able to help me and said the killings in Mirror probably have nothing to do with this dead dog but if another dog shows up dead, they will open an investigation… The dog’s body was found just outside of Stavely East. Black in color, young one if you ask me. Again no injuries to the dog. The picture looked like he had been placed there after being skinned.

My first reaction is that nothing will happen until ANOTHER dog is found in a similar situation? Why is that? Is this crime not heinous enough or concerning enough to warrant an investigation?

When Heather Anderson spoke with RCMP last year about the dog killings in Mirror, the investigating officer asked, So you are telling me that we have a serial dog killer in Mirror? Well, I think the facts from a couple weeks ago bear out the answer quite loudly. YES! You have a serial dog killer in Mirror.

And let’s not forget that research does show a link between this kind of abuse and abuse to humans.

EVERY one of these cases should be investigated BEFORE something worse happens.

If this had been a child or an elderly person found skinned and left by the side of the road, would we have waited for another victim to be found before we started an investigation? If it had been the dog of the mayor or the chief of police or someone else prominent, would we be waiting for the next one?

This seems like a case of JADed justice – i.e., JUST A DOG justice. The value of their life is really no less precious than our own. Life is the only thing that really is ours and it should be respected.


Mirror, AB dogs are again being poisoned

Mirror, AB dogs are again being poisoned

DOG PULLING ON STICK © Gjs | Dreamstime.com


It’s been a year since the poisoning of dogs last was news in Mirror. At that time, approximately 20 dogs were poisoned with a chemical typically used to kill gophers.

Over night last night, 14 dogs died from poisoning.

Calls starting coming in to the RCMP in Bashaw about 9:30 this morning and continued throughout the day. As of early Saturday evening, 13 deaths have been confirmed and a 14th is believed also to have been poisoned. All of the dead dogs were found in fenced-in yards or on their owner’s property.

It is thought that something the dogs ate contained an unknown substance. Toxicology reports from veterinarians to verify the substance are pending.

Please keep an eye on your dog(s) and do not leave them unattended in your yard.

Anyone with information or anyone who believes their dog has been poisoned is urged to call Constable Duek with the RCMP in Bashaw at (780) 372-3793.

Mirror is about 215 kilometres northeast of Calgary and about 66 kilometres East of Red Deer.

Symptoms of dog poisoning

The following are a few of the symptoms of dog poisoning that you can look out for. A lot of these symptoms are quite similar to those in human poisoning, and some of them can be indicative of other conditions and ailments.

  • Irritation or swelling of the mouth and throat
  • Drinking excessive amounts of water
  • Drooling or discharge from the nose
  • Stomach pain or cramps
  • Loss of balance or coordination
  • Change of color in urine
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Tremors, Convulsions or Seizures
  • Respiratory problems
  • Paralysis
  • Erratic heart rate

Some symptoms are extremely specific. For example, rat poison can prevent blood clotting which can mean that small injuries become quite serious, and if ingested it can cause internal bleeding which if not treated quickly enough can lead to death. Sometimes internal bleeding can be diagnosed by blood in the dog’s urine.

What to do if you Suspect Poisoning

If your dog displays any of the symptoms of dog poisoning, you need to seek proper veterinarian treatment as soon as possible. The very first thing to do is call your vet and ask for advice. If your dog has been poisoned, there are things you can do to help, but it depends on exactly what he has eaten. For example, inducing vomiting can help the dog to clear out whatever is causing the problem and a mixture often used for this is made up of a teaspoon of hydrogen peroxide and a teaspoon of milk.

You should never try to induce vomiting in cases of chemical poisoning such as cleaning products or gasoline or if the dog is in a stupor. In these cases trying to make the dog throw up can actually make it worse. Always at least ask your vet before trying something like this. It will be much easier if you know the exact cause, but even if you don’t, the vet will be able to tell you what to do.


Read other articles about the Mirror dog poisonings


Calgary vigil held for sled dogs slain in Whistler

Calgary vigil held for sled dogs slain in Whistler

View Calgary vigil photos

Calgary animal rights supporters petitioning for tougher cruelty laws

By Stephane Massinon, Calgary Herald

A hundred animal rights supporters held a vigil for the 100 sled dogs that were killed in Whistler one year ago.

Standing at Tompkin’s Place on 17 Avenue and 8 Street S.W. on Saturday night, they held signs and circulated petitions for tougher animal cruelty laws in Canada on the anniversary of a slaughter that garnered international attention.

The killings between April 21 and 23 were brought into the public’s attention when a sled dog company’s general manager applied for compensation for post-traumatic stress after the gruesome deaths of the dogs.

Holding a sign with a photograph of a husky that read “Why did we have to die?” Lauren Rigoni said she was moved to act.

“Animals can’t be treated like disposable objects; they have lives,” said the 12-year-old who painted whiskers on her face.

Event organizer Heather Anderson, founder of the DAISY Foundation, said the vigil was meant to help remember the animals that lost their lives.

“We’re out here just to stand up for these huskies that were murdered and to make sure that a mass murder like this will never happen in Canadian history again,” said Anderson.

She criticized the major political parties for largely ignoring the issue during the federal election. Anderson said she did, however, approve of the British Columbia task force into the sled dog deaths.

The BC provincial government has promised to adopt stricter animal cruelty laws by the fall and to adopt the ten recommendations of the Sled Dog Task Force.

Kevin Sparham, a Calgary resident and recreational sledder, brought two Siberian huskies to the vigil.

He said last year’s killing “brought a tear to the eye.”

He hopes the controversy around the killing brings attention to the issue.

“It needed to be brought up. Some kennels are good, some kennels aren’t,” said Sparham.

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reprinted from Calgary Herald | Other stories