A Walk for the Sled Dogs

A Walk for the Sled Dogs

PRESS RELEASE FROM THE D.A.I.S.Y? FOUNDATION

February 12, 2011

The D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation wants the press to be aware that on Sunday, February 13th there will be a walk at Edworthy Park in Calgary at 2:00 pm in honor of the 100 sled dogs that were murdered.

At 6:00 pm there will be a candlelight vigil in Innisfail, AB behind the aquatic centre at the ball diamond also in honor of the sled dogs. We would like to see a good turnout by the public as we need to send a message of awareness.

Better monitoring of these sled dog venture companies is a must in order to ensure proper treatment of these wonderful sentient beings. The general public is outraged about this incident but they are unaware of how many sled dogs are really put down in any given year in this country. Once there is no more need for a dog, the dog is murdered.

Once again the D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation wants to thank you, the media, for making the public aware.

Heather Anderson

D.A.I.S.Y? Foundation
403-475-0120
403-835-3197


Woman allowed injured cat’s leg to fall off

Woman allowed injured cat’s leg to fall off

CALGARY SUN | OCTOBER 26, 2010
By Kevin Martin

Leaving her elderly cat’s broken leg untreated for months, until it became gangrenous and fell off, has landed a Calgary woman a $2,000 fine.

And provincial court Judge Bruce Millar on Thursday also slapped Marlene Payne with a lifetime ban on owning pets, despite a Crown request for only a five-year prohibition.

“It seems simple to me that if people can’t look after, or care for a pet, they shouldn’t be pet owners,” Millar said. “In my view you should never own a pet again so there will be a lifetime prohibition.”

Payne, 57, pleaded guilty to a charge under the Animal Protection Act of allowing an animal to suffer, in this case her cat, Simonne.

Crown prosecutor Gord Haight said Payne first brought the feline to a veterinary clinic on July 18, 2009, suffering a leg injury.

She was told by staff the animal likely had a broken leg, but there was no technician present to do an x-ray and she should make an appointment to have it checked later, said Haight.

But Payne never got the injury checked, misunderstanding the instructions and believing the cat’s diagnosis of untreatable diabetes was the greater concern, he said.

But by March 3, of this year the injury had become so badly infected Payne brought the pet in for further treatment and it had to be euthanized, said Haight.

“The cat was in poor body condition, but most significantly was missing its right hind leg,” Haight told Millar.

He said the untreated broken leg from eight months earlier had “become gangrenous and fallen off.”

Defence lawyer Danusia Bourdon, who agreed to speak for the unrepresented Payne, said the city woman believed the diabetes diagnosis on her earlier visit was the greatest concern.

“She understood that the vet’s main concern was not the leg injury, but the diabetes,” said Bourdon, adding the 18-year-old feline was considered a family member.

Payne was told that at that age it would be useless to treat the diabetes with insulin and believed the lost limb was as a result of the disease.

“Looking back now Ms. Payne recognizes that she could and should have gone to a vet sooner.”

Outside court, DAISY Foundation spokeswoman Heather Anderson applauded Millar’s decision to hand Payne a lifetime ban on owning pets. “A leg falling off, that’s not just an abscess that wasn’t taken care of,” Anderson said.

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Dog owner jailed for animal cruelty

Dog owner jailed for animal cruelty

CALGARY HERALD — SEPTEMBER 29, 2010

A pet owner is going to jail for 30 days after flying into an uncontrollable rage when he returned home to find his seven-month-old German shepherd had damaged some furniture.

“What started out as disciplining the dog turned into physical abuse,” Crown prosecutor Gord Haight told court Tuesday after Thomas James Norman, 23, pleaded guilty to causing pain and suffering to the dog, Aurora.

“The dog was beaten to the point it ultimately fractured its femur — one of its legs — and suffered internal injuries, including a bleeding liver,” said Haight.

The prosecutor said once it was clear to Norman and his common-law wife that the dog had suffered significant injuries on July 15, 2008, they took it to the vet.

He said they couldn’t afford treatment, so they surrendered the dog to the Calgary Humane Society.

Norman has been prohibited from owning or possessing animals for two years.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/owner+jailed+animal+cruelty/3594752/story.html#ixzz13R4Nh6Fg

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Jail time, pet ban for dog abusing wife beater

Jail time, pet ban for dog abusing wife beater

CALGARY SUN | APRIL 19, 2010
By KEVIN MARTIN

Daisy Foundation, Heather AndersonBeating his wife, trying to strangle her dog with a noose and then spitting in a cop’s face has landed a Calgary man a seven-month jail term. But animal rights activists are applauding a secondary part of Bradley Kim Bergman’s punishment — a 10-year order that he have no pets.

Provincial court Judge Sean Dunnigan agreed with Crown prosecutor Gord Haight that Bergman’s conduct warranted at least a seven-month jail term.

Calling Bergman’s conduct “despicable,” Dunnigan said the admitted abuser still doesn’t understand the gravity of his actions.

“It appears … he does not see what he did to be any big deal,” Dunnigan said.

“Mr. Bergman seems to minimize his actions and excuse his criminal behaviour.”

The judge said Bergman’s attack on his common-law wife Denise Head’s pet Corgi, Buddy, was calculated to harm her further after he had repeatedly punched her.

“He intended her to suffer greatly,” Dunnigan said.

Bergman, 56, was angry at Buddy on March 1, 2009, for vomiting in their house and when he said he was going to “skin and gut” the animal, Head attempted to intervene.

When she did that he threatened to do the same to her before taking the dog to the garage and tightly tying a noose around its neck.

He also forced his way into a bathroom where Head had retreated for safety and to call police, before repeatedly punching her in the back.

When police arrived Bergman said he hoped the dog was already dead and spit into Const. David Grouchey’s face.

Police were able to save the animal, which was having trouble breathing.

Outside court, Haight said the 10-year pet ownership prohibition, under relatively new legislation, is the longest he’s seen in Calgary.

The penalty was applauded by a small group of animal lovers who had attended the sentencing.

Heather Anderson, of the DAISY Foundation, said she was pleased Bergman will have no control over any pet for the next decade.

“We’re really happy with the 10-year ban,” Anderson said.

“A 10-year ban is about as good as we’re going to get.”

She was also relieved to see that Bergman is going to jail.

“I’m glad he got some time I’m really happy about that, but it would’ve been nice (if it was) more time,” she said.

Along with jail, Dunnigan handed Bergman two year’s probation.

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Dog abuse cases jam court

Dog abuse cases jam court

CALGARY HERALD | FEBRUARY 10, 2010
BY DARYL SLADE

Animals rights activists showed up Tuesday at the Calgary Courts Centre as judges dealt with three cases of dog abuse in which animals were hanged, beaten to death and had eyes gouged.

“It’s really bad when in one day there are three cases on the court dockets in one city,” Heather Anderson, founder of DAISY (Delegates Against Inhuman Suffering Y?), said outside court.

“If the public sees these people are getting more than a slap on the wrist, they’ll quit doing it. The general public doesn’t realize how many cases there really are, yet only a very small percentage even make it to court.”

Bradley Kim Bergman, 56, faces jail time after pleading guilty to assaulting his common-law wife, who tried to stop him from hanging her dog after the pet vomited in their house. Bergman also admitted to the animal abuse charges and spitting in the face of a police officer who answered the domestic call for help.

“The assault against Ms. (Denise) Head . . . no doubt induced a fair amount of terror,” Crown prosecutor Gord Haight argued in seeking a sentence of seven to 10 months.

Lawyer Patrick Flynn said his client suffered from depression and is on medication to control his anger.

“This man, for many reasons, has not been treated properly (medically),” said Flynn.

Court previously heard Bergman told Head after her six-year-old dog Buddy vomited: “I’m going to show you I can skin and gut a dog.”

The woman stepped in front of Bergman, who took the dog out to the garage and tied a noose around its neck.

Head called police and an officer had to cut the rope to save the dog’s life. Const. David Grouchey asked Bergman about the dog and Bergman said he hoped it was dead by now, then spit in the officer’s face.

The dog has since been adopted.

The case will be back in court on Friday to set a date for sentencing.

Michael Rabeau, charged with the beating death of a puppy, had his case adjourned until today to set a trial date. He had pleaded guilty but changed back to not guilty.

Donald Ainsworth pleaded guilty to a similar charge of animal abuse, and had his case adjourned until Feb. 17. He is charged with inflicting severe eye injuries to a dog named Gucci.

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Animal rights group calls for changes in the law

Animal rights group calls for changes in the law

CTV CALGARY | FEBRUARY 9, 2010

Three separate cases involving animal cruelty were before the courts in Calgary on Tuesday.

One of the cases involved Bradley Bergman. The 56-year-old plead guilty to tying a noose around the neck of his girlfriend’s dog and threatening to hand and gut the animal.

While the cases were going on inside, The Daisy Foundation held a demonstration outside. “As far as the law goes, because this was his property, he’s probably going to get away with it, because of the property law in Canada – that animals are considered property – which is ridiculous,” says Heather Anderson, a member of the animal rights group.

Also in court on Tuesday was Donald Ainsworth. He pled guilty to animal cruelty for beating his dog with a flashlight – an assault that left the animal blind in one eye.

The third case involved a man accused of beating to death a four-month-old puppy. This case has been set over.

“It just goes to show how many cases are really happening in this county. And when you consider these are the cases going to court, what about the ones that didn’t have enough evidence,” says Anderson.

The Daisy Foundation says changes are needed to Canadian law so animal abusers are given stiffer sentences. The group is lobbying the federal government to pass Bill C-229.

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Abused puppy case given $9,400 boost

Abused puppy case given $9,400 boost

CALGARY SUN | NOVEMBER 30, 2009

The search for the person who savagely beat a three-month-old puppy was thrown a $9,400 treat by a donor furious over the assault.

The donation to the animal advocate Daisy Foundation brings the total bounty for information leading to the conviction of the animal abuser to at least $10,500, said the group’s founder, Heather Anderson.

“We were hoping it would go to $1,000, then this,” said Anderson, adding the anonymous donor owns two dogs.

“He’s obviously an animal lover and he was obviously mad about it.”

On Nov. 3, the bloodied, emaciated and unconscious Doberman pup was found in the parking lot of the Calgary North Veterinary Hospital at 4202 4 St. N.W.

Among the wounds suffered by the dog nicknamed Mike was a broken left foreleg and head injuries. But after surgery, the animal is recovering well, say Calgary Humane Society officials.

Henderson said news of the donation — given Thursday — has already made a difference in the investigation.

“We had more leads this morning than we had when the fund was at $600,” she said.

Even if the reward is claimed, Henderson said the foundation is determined to create a permanent cash pool for such cases.

And unless Canadians press politicians to increase the penalties for animal abuse, such donations will continue to be needed, she said.

“Even we get a conviction for this guy, he’ll just get a slap on the wrist,” she said.

Anyone with information that can lead to the name of the dog’s owner is urged to call the Calgary Humane Society at 403-723-6038.

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