Reflecting on Mirror

Reflecting on Mirror

DOG'S HEAD © Jeffrey Marini | Dreamstime.com


Things seem quiet in Mirror these days after the dog poisonings in April. However, what has changed?

Last I knew, there was to be a town hall meeting in Mirror between residents and officials to discuss the poisoning deaths of 13 dogs and what was going to be done about it. But last I heard, the meeting never happened.

When the first reported poisoning of dogs happened a year ago, one RCMP officer involved in the poisonings talked with Daisy Foundation’s Heather Anderson. At that time, Heather pointed out research that shows a link between animal abuse and abuse of people. The officer rather sarcastically asked Heather if she was suggesting that there was a serial dog killer in Mirror. Her reply was, “Yes!”

A year passed and in April, at least 13 dogs died from poisoning in an overnight period. Coincidence? Or serial dog killer? My bet is on the latter.

It’s been a few months now and as expected, the hysteria has mostly subsided. People have returned to their normal lives. But what about the families victimized by the poisonings. At least one family lost dogs they had added to their family after their previous dog had been poisoned a year back. This family has again been victimized, traumatized and hurt. I wonder how they are doing these days?

Well, I think it’s time to shake out the rug and see what has settled underneath. Let’s not wait another year or even another season to see if the killer strikes again. Let’s raise some awareness.

I am asking the people of Mirror who have lost a pet to the poisonings to send me their story (Enable Javascript to see the email address) and a photo of their beloved dog. Let’s see if we can’t renew our search for justice and move forward to some resolution beyond what we have right now.


Mirror, AB dogs are again being poisoned

Mirror, AB dogs are again being poisoned

DOG PULLING ON STICK © Gjs | Dreamstime.com


It’s been a year since the poisoning of dogs last was news in Mirror. At that time, approximately 20 dogs were poisoned with a chemical typically used to kill gophers.

Over night last night, 14 dogs died from poisoning.

Calls starting coming in to the RCMP in Bashaw about 9:30 this morning and continued throughout the day. As of early Saturday evening, 13 deaths have been confirmed and a 14th is believed also to have been poisoned. All of the dead dogs were found in fenced-in yards or on their owner’s property.

It is thought that something the dogs ate contained an unknown substance. Toxicology reports from veterinarians to verify the substance are pending.

Please keep an eye on your dog(s) and do not leave them unattended in your yard.

Anyone with information or anyone who believes their dog has been poisoned is urged to call Constable Duek with the RCMP in Bashaw at (780) 372-3793.

Mirror is about 215 kilometres northeast of Calgary and about 66 kilometres East of Red Deer.

Symptoms of dog poisoning

The following are a few of the symptoms of dog poisoning that you can look out for. A lot of these symptoms are quite similar to those in human poisoning, and some of them can be indicative of other conditions and ailments.

  • Irritation or swelling of the mouth and throat
  • Drinking excessive amounts of water
  • Drooling or discharge from the nose
  • Stomach pain or cramps
  • Loss of balance or coordination
  • Change of color in urine
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Tremors, Convulsions or Seizures
  • Respiratory problems
  • Paralysis
  • Erratic heart rate

Some symptoms are extremely specific. For example, rat poison can prevent blood clotting which can mean that small injuries become quite serious, and if ingested it can cause internal bleeding which if not treated quickly enough can lead to death. Sometimes internal bleeding can be diagnosed by blood in the dog’s urine.

What to do if you Suspect Poisoning

If your dog displays any of the symptoms of dog poisoning, you need to seek proper veterinarian treatment as soon as possible. The very first thing to do is call your vet and ask for advice. If your dog has been poisoned, there are things you can do to help, but it depends on exactly what he has eaten. For example, inducing vomiting can help the dog to clear out whatever is causing the problem and a mixture often used for this is made up of a teaspoon of hydrogen peroxide and a teaspoon of milk.

You should never try to induce vomiting in cases of chemical poisoning such as cleaning products or gasoline or if the dog is in a stupor. In these cases trying to make the dog throw up can actually make it worse. Always at least ask your vet before trying something like this. It will be much easier if you know the exact cause, but even if you don’t, the vet will be able to tell you what to do.


Read other articles about the Mirror dog poisonings